Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Views of Lysefjord from Preikestolen
Writer Bob Andre Engelsen

Bob André Engelsen

Author
3 mins read

3 ways to experience the Lysefjord

Check out 3 ways to explore the southernmost big fjord in Norway.

On a fjord cruise 

This is definitely the most relaxing and comfortable way to see the fjord.

Departing from the harbor of Stavanger, you can admire the fjord and its attractions from the comfort of a boat, either through panoramic windows or on the sundeck. Among others the cruise takes you by the mysterious Fantahålå (Vagabond’s Cave) and up close to the Hengjane Falls. The highlight of the tour is of course the view of the world famous Preikestolen from below.

On a hike to the Kjerag boulder

The Kjerag boulder, also known as the Kjerag bolt or Kjeragbolten is a popular tourist attraction and a base jumper’s paradise. 

A bus will bring you from Stavanger to Øygardstøl, the starting point of the spectacular hike up to Kjerag, also known as the Kjerag bolt or Kjeragbolten. The hike is challenging, but the spectacular views of the Lysefjord is worth the sweat. The Kjerag Boulder sits wedged in a mountain crevice suspended nearly 1,000 m (3280 ft) above the fjord. The most daring hikers take the leap out onto the rock to get the famous shot almost 1,000 meters (3280 ft) above the fjord. You have 6 hours to complete the hike. When you're down safe and sound, the bus drives you back to Stavanger. 

PS: make sure to check the weather condition and dress in proper hiking gear. Bring extra layers and plenty of food and drinks.

On a hike to Preikestolen

This is one of the most popular hiking destinations in all of Norway.

From central Stavanger a coach bus whisks you right to the start of the hike to Preikestolen (Pulpit Rock) in an hour or less. On the way you get to ride through the world’s newest and longest subsea tunnel. The hike up to Preikestolen is challenging, so make sure you're prepared. Parts of the trail have beautiful granite stairways engineered by Nepalese Sherpas. 

The Preikestolen plateau measures 25 X 25 meters (ft. 82 by 82), and offers some incredible fjord views from 604 meters (1975 ft) above. Round-trip the hike takes between 4 and 5 hours. At the end you can kick back in the bus seat, swipe through your shots and digest the hike view and hike while the bus takes you back to town.

An alternative to completing the hike in one day is to buy a one way ticket to Preikestolen. This way you have more flexibility to stay in the Preikestolen area and explore other nearlying parts.

It is also worth mentioning that a combined Kjerag and Preikestolen package exits, offering you a discounted price. The two hikes will be completed on different days so that you have time to recharge your own battery as well as that of your camera in between.

PS: Always check the weather conditions so that you can dress according to the forecast. Proper hiking boots are a must, as well as a daypack with plenty of food and drinks.